SCOTUS: EEOC exhaustion is not jurisdictional

Monday's unanimous US Supreme Court Title VII decision in favor of the employee does not give employee-plaintiffs a free pass. Exhaustion of EEOC administrative processes is still required. All the Court did was say exhaustion is not a jurisdictional question that can be raised after five years of litigation. Employers can still get cases dismissed for failure to exhaust if they raise the issue early on in the litigation.

Fort Bend County v. Davis (US Supreme Ct 06/03/2019) [PDF]

The employee filed an EEOC charge claiming sex harassment. Later she wanted to add religion. So she wrote “religion” on the intake form, but she never revised the formal EEOC charging document.

Then she sued claiming religious discrimination, and the employer — after years of litigation — raised the question that the EEOC form had not been properly filled out. So the question was: is this a jurisdictional issue that the employer can raise at any time even the years later? Or is it a claims processing rule that the employer waived by waiting so long?

The US Supreme Court says it's non-jurisdictional.

So this is something the employer can raise but – use it or lose it.